Essay topics about english language

Of other pictures you tire, if you have them constantly before you; of his, never. The authority of the board and its ability to reject his recommendations have not been touched, and its disposition to trust him and accept his advice will be surely increased as it sees that he is adopting plans to improve that advice and give it force. The absurdity of this forcing of oneself on the notice of the public, like that of pushing one’s way into “society,” grows clearer when we reflect on the real value of the object of pursuit. Lecky frequently dwells on this fact, as in the following passage: “In most men the love of truth is so languid, and their reluctance to encounter mental prejudices is so great, that they yield their judgments without an effort to the current, withdraw their minds from all opinions or arguments opposed to their own, and thus speedily convince themselves of the truth of what they wish to believe.” Dr. It is best, therefore, not to attempt to catch them. Immediately the burn on his hand reappeared, and a similar one took possession of his wife’s hand, scorching both to the bone and inflicting such excruciating agony that being unable to repress their screams, and fearing to betray themselves, they took to the woods, where they howled like wolves. With them the immediate or last impression is every thing: with us, the first, if it is sufficiently strong and gloomy, never wears out! Every body agrees to the general maxim, that as the event does not depend on the agent, it ought to have no influence upon our sentiments, with regard to the merit or propriety of his conduct. All users of a library are not delinquents or law-breakers, and the assistants have other and better work than to act as fine-collectors and detectives. Nor does he collect his strength to strike fire from the flint by the sharpness of collision, by the eagerness of his blows. George Lane Fox-Pitt. There is perhaps some doubt whether we should include in this sort of material musical records, either for the mechanical organ and piano or for the phonograph. And when that sphere came to be enlarged, he still could not conceive that the visible objects which it presented could be larger than those which he had first seen. This is a state of things which ought not to be allowed to remain as it is, for a single hour, in this boasted land of liberty; I do not say, that it ever has taken place, though I have known one or two instances that might almost bear essay topics about english language such a construction;—but I maintain that it may take place, for there is no law to prevent it; that individuals may have been sent into such seclusion, who never suffered from the pangs of madness; and it must be evident to every one who gives this subject the least consideration, that it only requires a faithful keeper, and that watchfulness, to retain such a person in prison for life. In the Soul it can’t be, if what I have hear’d some learned Men maintain, be true, that all Souls are equal, and alike, and that consequently there is no such distinction, as Male and Female Souls; that there are no innate _Idea’s_, but that all the Notions we have, are deriv’d from our External Senses, either immediately, or by Reflection. Their familiar conversation and intercourse soon become less pleasing to them, and, upon that account, less frequent. The root-word for measuring length is, in Cakchiquel, _et_. No harm is meant by all this, but a great deal of mischief may accrue. They are concerned when it contains books of which they disapprove, and are anxious to put on its shelves works that will interest their own people. The best converser I know is, however, the best listener. The effects of grief and joy terminate in the person who feels those emotions, of which the expressions do not, like those of resentment, suggest to us the idea of any other person for whom we are concerned, and whose interests are opposite to his. Punctual? His earnest desire to reach the fundamental laws of language led him into a long series of investigations into the systems of recorded speech, phonetic hieroglyphics and alphabetic writing, on which he read memoirs of great acuteness. 5. We have libraries running under all kinds of conditions and we have statistical reports of those conditions and of the resulting cost. He is to give the choice and picked results of a whole life of study; what he has struck out in his most felicitous moods, has treasured up with most pride, has laboured to bring to light with most anxiety and confidence of success. First, I say, though the intentions of any person should be ever so proper and beneficent, on the one hand, or ever so improper and malevolent, on the other, yet, if they fail in producing their effects, his merit seems imperfect in the one case, and his demerit incomplete in the other. Both would admit that their output has been affected by the great extension of the reading public and its consequent alteration in quality. Books that describe in decorous language ingenious methods of shop-lifting are given place, but you look in vain for works of lofty moral tone couched in diction that is occasionally coarse. Do we not at a glance perceive a grotesque whole, _viz._, a hat on the wrong head, and is not our amusement too swiftly forthcoming to allow of our singling out a part of what is seen and going through the {13} process of thought described by the ingenious author of this theory? We have from this same root several other words of curiously diverse meanings. Indeed, as a judicial process, it is only to be found prescribed in the earlier remains of the Barbarian laws and customs, and no trace of it is to be met with in the latter legislation of any race.

about topics language english essay. A traveller in South Africa had learned some sentences of the speech of a tribe (the Sichuana language) from his man. This is commonplace, and it is uncritical. Our own Elizabethan and Jacobean poetry—in so nice a problem it is much safer to stick to one’s own language—is repeatedly called “rhetorical.” It had this and that notable quality, but, when we wish to admit that it had defects, it is rhetorical. To begin with, we will try to avoid the error of those who in their subtle disquisitions on the comic idea forgot that laughter is a bodily act, and not fear to allude to such unmetaphysical entities as lung and diaphragm, where they seem to be a central fact in the situation. I am convinced that any one who has reflected much on his own feelings must have found it impossible to refer them all to the same fixed invariable standard of good or evil, or by throwing away the mere husk and refuse without losing any thing essential to the feeling to arrive at some one simple principle, the same in all cases, and which determines by it’s quantity alone the precise degree of good or evil in any sensation. The disposition to the affections which drive men from one another, and which tend, as it were, to break the bands of human society; the disposition to anger, hatred, envy, malice, revenge; is, on the contrary, much more apt to offend by its excess than by its defect. That all these plans are admirable in many ways may be freely acknowledged. Henry Dwight Sidgwick, who desires to improve our understanding of Dante as a “spiritual leader,” says: To Dante this literal Hell was a secondary matter; so it is to us. A high authority of the present day (Mr. Let a man be wise, and then let us ask, will his wisdom make him proud? _S._ Why then endeavour to make them so; or in other words, to make them more than they are or can become? But whoever becomes wise, becomes wise by sympathy; whoever is powerful, becomes so by making others sympathize with him. Books are to be used by reading them. A very devout Quaker, who upon being struck upon one cheek, instead of turning up the other, should so far forget his literal interpretation of our Saviour’s precept, as to bestow some good discipline upon the brute that insulted him, would not be disagreeable to us. When they approved very much of the motives of his deceit, they have sometimes acquitted him, though, to do the casuists justice, they have in general and much more frequently condemned him. A quiet survey of things, at once playful and reflective; a mode of greeting amusing shows which seems in its moderation to be both an indulgence in the sense of fun and an expiation for the rudeness of such indulgence; an outward, expansive movement of the spirits met and retarded by a cross-current of something like kindly thoughtfulness; these clearly reveal themselves as some of its dominant traits. There is, however, a class of persons who have a particular satisfaction in falsifying your expectations of pleasure in their society, who make appointments for no other ostensible purpose than _not to keep them_; who think their ill-behaviour gives them an air of superiority over you, instead of placing them at your mercy; and who, in fact, in all their overtures of condescending kindness towards you, treat you exactly as if there was no such person in the world. In their different dialects the sounds of _n_, _l_, and _r_ were alternated, so that while Thomas Campanius, who translated the Catechism into Delaware about 1645, wrote that word _rhennus_, later writers have given it _lenno_, and translate it “man.” This is the word which we find in the name Lenni Lenape, which, by essay topics about english language its derivation, means “we, we men.” The antecedent _lenni_ is superfluous. These words are as follows: “Here begins the record of what happened in old times in the land of the Quiches. The true impulse to voluntary action can only exist in the mind of a being capable of foreseeing the consequences of things, of being interested in them from the imaginary impression thus made upon his mind, and of making choice of the means necessary to produce, or prevent what he desires or dreads. But the word has several other significations which should be considered. They turn away their their eyes from him, if the extremity of his distress forces them to look at him, it is only to spurn so disagreeable an object from among them. When I envisage a person as correctly or as oddly dressed, I do not in either case need to have a schematic representation of the proper typical style of dress. Bryan’s impartial government newspaper has not yet printed its first number.

Such incongruities as moral and logical inconsistencies have, it must be remembered, their disagreeable and even their painful aspect. The relation of man to himself and others as a moral being is plainly determined, for whether a regard to the future welfare of himself and others is the real, or only the ostensible motive of his actions, they all tend to one or other of these objects, and to one as directly as the other, which is the only thing worth inquiring about. The intense feeling, ecstatic or terrible, without an object or exceeding its object, is something which every person of sensibility has known; it is doubtless a study to pathologists. Do they not quarrel with their neighbours, placard their opponents, supplant those on their own side of the question? In a little time, therefore, he generally leaves all his old friends behind him, some of the meanest of them excepted, who may, perhaps, condescend to become his dependents: nor does he always acquire any new ones; the {40} pride of his new connections is as much affronted at finding him their equal, as that of his old ones had been by his becoming their superior; and it requires the most obstinate and persevering modesty to atone for this modification to either. The beauty of poetry is a matter of such nicety, that a young beginner can scarce ever be certain that he has attained it. I quote, as an example, a short prophecy attributed to Ahkul Chel, “priest of the idols.” It is found in several of the oldest Maya manuscripts, and is in all probability authentic, as it contains nothing which would lead us to suppose that it was one of the “pious frauds” of the essay topics about english language missionaries. The swift alternations of moments of nascent fear and of joyous recognition of the fun of the thing are eminently fitted to supply the conditions of a sudden rising of the spirits. It would, in particular, help us to see how the reaction comes to be definitely co-ordinated with the sense of make-believe, and the attitude of throwing off the burdensome restrictions of reality. For these he has given up every thing, wealth, pleasure, ease, health; and yet we are to be told he takes no interest in them, does not enter into the meaning of the words he uses, or feel the force of the ideas he imprints upon the brain of others. Our friend, whom we should meet at a masquerade in the garb of our enemy, would be more diverted than mortified, if under that disguise we should vent our indignation against him. To laugh away the spare moments will continue to be to the laughter-loving the same delightful pastime even should we succeed in showing that it brings other blessings in its train. He will be pleased that the children in his library have learned to wash their hands, but chiefly because he hopes that what they have learned may react upon the physical cleanliness–and perhaps on the moral cleanliness, too–of the community. His good sense may be equal to the detection of some of the huge follies in the matter of dress and other customs to which the enlightened European so comically clings. Who rests not pleased with such happiness, Well worthy he to taste of wretchedness!’ Without air or light, they grope their way under-ground, till they are made ‘fierce with dark keeping:’[27] their attention, confined to the same dry, hard, mechanical subjects, which they have not the power nor the will to exchange for others, frets and corrodes; and soured and disappointed, they wreak their spite and mortification on all around them. It is a plan which we find most highly developed in the rudest languages, and therefore we may reasonably believe that it characterized prehistoric speech. I read to him the forms in Zeisberger’s Grammar which are supposed to indicate it, but he explained them all by other reasons, mere irregularities or erroneous expressions. 16. A character is not to be composed of scattered observations of human nature, but of parts which are felt together. Symons, the critical successor of Pater, and partly of Swinburne (I fancy that the phrase “sick or sorry” is the common property of all three), _is_ the “impressionistic critic.” He, if anyone, would be said to expose a sensitive and cultivated mind—cultivated, that is, by the accumulation of a considerable variety of impressions from all the arts and several languages—before an “object”; and his criticism, if anyone’s, would be said to exhibit to us, like the plate, the faithful record of the impressions, more numerous or more refined than our own, upon a mind more sensitive than our own. When there was occasion, therefore, to mention any particular object, it often became necessary to distinguish it from the other objects comprehended under the same general name, either, first, by its peculiar qualities; or, secondly, by the {307} peculiar relation which it stood in to some other things. If it were possible to contrive a perfect language, consistent with itself, and answering to the complexity of human affairs, there would be some excuse for the attempt; but he who knows any thing of the nature of language, or of the complexity of human thought, knows that this is impossible. Our analysis of the objects which entice the laugh from man has suggested that the risible aspect nearly always coexists with other aspects. Not only does a change in ideas, sentiments or institutions tend to modify the expression of the mirthful mood, there is a reciprocal influence of laughter upon ideas, sentiments and institutions. Patrick, the delay of five days in a distress is explained by the history of a combat between two long previous in Magh-inis. Secondly, I say, That wherever the conduct of the agent appears to have been entirely directed by motives and affections which we thoroughly enter into and approve of, we can have no sort of sympathy with the resentment of the sufferer, how great soever the mischief which may have been done to him. His object is to astonish the reader into belief, as jugglers make clowns gape and swallow whatever they please. Instances will occur to every one. They were to be peers of the accused; and though he was allowed to select them, yet the qualification that they were to be good men and orthodox practically left their nomination to the officials—even as the customary accusation by the promotor-fiscal was held to be in itself the requisite amount of suspicion required as a condition precedent for the trial.